John Faraday Fraud

John Faraday Fraud

John Faraday Fraud what is fraud wrongful or criminal deception intended to result in financial or personal gain.

“he was convicted of fraud”

synonyms:

fraudulence, sharp practice, cheating, swindling, trickery, artifice, deceit, deception, double-dealing, duplicity, treachery, chicanery, skulduggery, imposture, embezzlement; More

informalmonkey business, funny business, crookedness, hanky-panky, shenanigans, flimflam;

informaljiggery-pokery;

informalmonkeyshines;

archaicmanagement, knavery

“his business partner was arrested for fraud”

deception, trick, cheat, hoax, subterfuge, stratagem, wile, ruse, artifice, swindle, racket;

informalscam, con, con trick, rip-off, leg-pull, sting, gyp, kite, diddle, fiddle, swizzle;

informalbunco, boondoggle, hustle, grift;

informalrort

“they were accomplices in a fraud”

  • a person or thing intended to deceive others, typically by unjustifiably claiming or being credited with accomplishments or qualities.

“mediums exposed as tricksters and frauds”

synonyms:

impostor, fake, sham, pretender, hoodwinker, masquerader, charlatan, quack, mountebank;

swindler, fraudster, racketeer, cheat, cheater, double-dealer, trickster, confidence trickster;

informalphoney, conman, con artist;

datedconfidence man

“they exposed him as a fraud”

sham, hoax, imitation, copy, dummy, mock-up;

fake, forgery, counterfeit;

informalphoney, dupe

“the report is a fraud”

John Faraday Fraud advice from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fraud

In law, fraud is deliberate deception to secure unfair or unlawful gain, or to deprive a victim of a legal right. Fraud itself can be a civil wrong (i.e., a fraud victim may sue the fraud perpetrator to avoid the fraud or recover monetary compensation), a criminal wrong (i.e., a fraud perpetrator may be prosecuted and imprisoned by governmental authorities), or it may cause no loss of money, property or legal right but still be an element of another civil or criminal wrong.[1] The purpose of fraud may be monetary gain or other benefits, such as obtaining a passport or travel document, driver’s license or qualifying for a mortgage by way of false statements.[2]

A hoax is a distinct concept that involves deliberate deception without the intention of gain or of materially damaging or depriving a victim.

As a civil wrong

In common law jurisdictions, as a civil wrong, fraud is a tort. While the precise definitions and requirements of proof vary among jurisdictions, the requisite elements of fraud as a tort generally are the intentional misrepresentation or concealment of an important fact upon which the victim is meant to rely, and in fact does rely, to the harm of the victim.[3] Proving fraud in a court of law is often said to be difficult.[citation needed] That difficulty is found, for instance, in that each and every one of the elements of fraud must be proven, that the elements include proving the states of mind of the perpetrator and the victim, and that some jurisdictions require the victim to prove fraud by clear and convincing evidence.[citation needed]

The remedies for fraud may include rescission (i.e., reversal) of a fraudulently obtained agreement or transaction, the recovery of a monetary award to compensate for the harm caused, punitive damages to punish or deter the misconduct, and possibly others.[citation needed]

In cases of a fraudulently induced contract, fraud may serve as a defense in a civil action for breach of contract or specific performance of contract.

Fraud may serve as a basis for a court to invoke its equitable jurisdiction.

As a criminal offence John Faraday

In common law jurisdictions, as a criminal offence, fraud takes many different forms, some general (e.g., theft by false pretense) and some specific to particular categories of victims or misconduct (e.g., bank fraud, insurance fraud, forgery). The elements of fraud as a crime similarly vary. The requisite elements of perhaps the most general form of criminal fraud, theft by false pretense, are the intentional deception of a victim by false representation or pretense with the intent of persuading the victim to part with property and with the victim parting with property in reliance on the representation or pretense and with the perpetrator intending to keep the property from the victim.[4]