Slough

john faraday

John Faraday lives in the leafy suburbs of (Stoke Poges) Slough which is part of Buckinghamshire.

Stoke Poges is a green-buffered scattered village and civil parish in the South Bucks district of Buckinghamshire, England. It is centred approximately three miles north of Slough (historically Upton-cum-Chalvey), its post town, and a mile east of Farnham Common John Faraday has made it his home for the last 15 plus years.

John Faraday takes a big part in his community activity participating in local fund raising. 

Origin of the name

In the name Stoke Poges, stoke means “stockaded (place)” that is staked with more than just boundary-marking stakes. In the Domesday Book of 1086, the village was recorded as Stoche. William Fitz-Ansculf, who held the manor in 1086 (in the grounds of which the Norman parish church was built), later became known as William Stoches or William of Stoke. Two hundred years after William, Amicia of Stoke, heiress to the manor, married Robert Pogeys, Knight of the Shire, and the village eventually became known as Stoke Poges. The spelling appearing as “Stoke Pocheys”, if applicable to this village, may suggest the pronunciation of the second part to have a slightly more open “o” sound compared with the word “Stoke”.[2]

Stoke Poges Manor House

Main article: Stoke Park, Buckinghamshire

A manor house at Stoke Poges was built before the Norman Conquest and was mentioned in the 1086 Domesday Book. In 1555 the owner, Francis Hastings, 2nd Earl of Huntingdon, pulled down much of the existing fortified house. He replaced it with a large Tudor brick-built house, with numerous chimneys and gables. In 1599 it was acquired by Sir Edward Coke, who is said to have entertained Queen Elizabeth I there in 1601.

A few decades later, the married lady of the manor, Frances Coke, Viscountess Purbeck, the daughter of Sir Edward Coke, had a love affair with Robert Howard, a member of parliament. The affair’s discovery was received as a scandal upon the three people involved, and in 1635 Lady Frances was imprisoned for adultery. She later escaped from prison to France, and eventually returned and lived at Stoke Poges Manor for a time. She died at Oxford in 1645 at the court of King Charles I.

Charles I himself was imprisoned at Stoke Poges Manor in 1647 before his execution.

Later the manor came into the possession of Thomas Penn, a son of William Penn who founded Pennsylvania and was its first proprietor. Thomas Penn held three-fourths of the proprietorship. The manor property remained in his family for at least two generations, as his son John Penn “of Stoke” also lived there. Thomas Gray‘s 1750 poem “A Long Story” describes the house and its occupants.[3] Sir Edwin Henry Landseer was a frequent visitor to the house and rented it as a studio for some time. His most famous painting, The Monarch of the Glen (1851), is said to have been created at Stoke Poges, with the deer in the park used as models.

Education

Stoke Poges has a primary school called The Stoke Poges School. There is also a Sikh faith secondary school, Khalsa Secondary Academy, whose curriculum includes horse riding and archery. It is rated ‘Good’ by Ofsted.

St Giles’ church

Gray’s “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” is believed to have been written in the churchyard of the Church of England parish church of Saint Giles in Stoke Poges, also known as the Stoke Poges Church. Other churches have claimed the honour, including St Laurence’s in Upton and St. Mary’s in Everdon, Northamptonshire.

Gray is buried at St Giles’. John Penn “of Stoke” had a large monument built, displaying verses from the Elegy, nearby.

The Georgian rectory was built by Thomas Penn of Stoke Park in 1765. It is now a private residence called Elegy House.

 

 

 

 

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